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Windows MultiPoint Server 2010

Windows MultiPoint Server 2010

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Q: (from Stacy)

We are still getting requests from resellers for quotes on Multi-Point Server.  These are resellers who are selling the nComputing devices into smaller schools and they are coming to us for guidance.  The only thing is we haven’t had training to really address their questions.  Below are some of the questions we have run into:

  1. There is a Multi-Point CAL that comes with a Win Server CAL, is Server required in the environment?
  2. The Desktop environment that is being emulated is Windows 7, is it possible to downgrade and show XP instead?
  3. How does Office tie in?  Can Office be loaded and run as an RDS Application on Multi-Point?
  4. Is there a limit on the number of devices that can be connected?
  5. Are any other licenses needed to run the OS on the machines connected to Multi-Point Server?

A:

For those of you not aware, Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 is designed as a shared computing resource for academic institutions that are looking for a cost effective, easily managed, Windows 7 like desktop experience for students. More details can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/windows/multipoint.

  1. There is a Multi-Point CAL that comes with a Win Server CAL, is Server required in the environment?
    No, just the Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 Academic Server license. If the Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 is purchased (OEM w/hardware) you customers do not need to purchase the Windows Server CALs, just the Windows MultiPoint CALs.
  2. The Desktop environment that is being emulated is Windows 7, is it possible to downgrade and show XP instead?
    No. The desktop is Windows 7 without all of the Aero features like 3D Flip and Live Task Bar Previews nor advanced features like Media Center. In addition, Windows XP Mode is not supported with Windows MultiPoint Server.
  3. How does Office tie in?  Can Office be loaded and run as an RDS Application on Multi-Point?
    Office needs to be licensed via Volume Licensing so you can leverage the Network Device rights which allows you to install Office on a network device and run it from the licensed device. For example, if you have Windows MulitPoint Server 2010 with 6 CALs and 6 workstations, you would need to license Office for 6 devices and then install it on the Windows MultiPoint Server. So the answer to your questions is loosely “yes”.
  4. Is there a limit on the number of devices that can be connected?
    This depends on how Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 is purchased. If just the software is purchased through Open Value Academic the number of CALs that can be purchased is unlimited (although 10 is recommended). If the OEM (with hardware) is taken, the number of CALs is absolutely 10. In either case, the hardware used needs to support the number of clients (memory, processor, disk, etc). BTW, either device or user CALs can be purchased for Windows MultiPoint Server.
  5. Are any other licenses needed to run the OS on the machines connected to Multi-Point Server?
    Every user/device accessing the Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 Academic needs a Windows MultiPoint Server CAL and a Windows Server CAL. Every user/device accessing the Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 (OEM) just needs a Windows MulitPoint Server CAL. BTW, additional CALs are needed if the server keyboard and screen are also used as workstation.

Steve

Comments
  • I've got a release candidate for Multipoint Server 2010 running on a quad-core Q8200 PC with 8gb of ram. I've installed some geo-informantics software as well as Office 2007 Enterprise and the multi-console functionality of these apps is really nice. I've installed other apps like Autocad, Coreldraw and Adobe CS3, and I'm running XP in a VMware player for software that only runs in XP.  I've set the desktop up to look as closely as XP-classic mode as possibe (similar to Win-98).  

    I have yet to get sound-through-USB working (but that's not a priority).  I think it's a joke that Microsoft has positioned MPS as a solution for grade-school classrooms.  It's obvious that MPS is perfect for small work-group office clusters, call centers, etc.  

    I downloaded MPS 2010 from a file-sharing site back in February, and I activated it with a Server 2008-R2 technet license.  During installation I told it I had 16 user licenses and it simply took that without giving me a hassle.   The Office 2007 Enterprise is also from technet.  

    I haven't seen much written anywhere about MPS since the PR that microsoft put out back in February.  Microsoft is really keeping this off the radar screen.  They don't want SMB's to get wind of this and start asking about deploying it in the office.

  • Is it possible to use VS2010 with MPS 2010?

  • Does the CAL is the same as the license key of the WMPS 2010?

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