This is a blog post in the series “How to set up a product-centric website in SharePoint Server 2013”.  In this series, I'll use data from a fictitious company called "Contoso" to show you how to use search features to set up a website based on product catalog data.  

For an overview of the blog posts in this series, go to How to set up a product-centric website in SharePoint Server 2013.

 

Quick overview

In Stage 4: Set up search and enable the crawling of your catalog content, I showed you how to set up search and enable crawling of your catalog content. In this blog post, I'll explain what happens to site columns during crawl.

When a catalog is crawled, the catalog content is added to the search index, where the site columns are represented as crawled and managed properties. Now, I just threw a lot of new words at you, so, let me explain more about the search index and crawled and managed properties.

 

In this blog post, we'll learn:

 

 

About the search index

 Let's start by going back to our overview diagram.

Overview of Contoso architecture

1. When a content source is crawled, its contents and metadata are added to the search index. In our scenario, that means that the content from the Products catalog is added to the search index. 

2. To display content on the publishing portal (the Contoso website), Search Web Parts are used. Search Web Parts contain a query, for example, "show all MP3 players that have the color red" (note: the query is not formulated in such common language, but for now, let's just keep it simple).  So when users navigate to a page that contains a Search Web Part, the query for red MP3 players is automatically sent to the search index. The query result is returned from the search index, and all red MP3 players are shown in the Search Web Part on the page.

 

What is important to understand, is that the content that we add to the search index, determines which search results can be returned when queries are issued from Search Web Parts. Simply put; if the content from our Products catalog isn't added to the search index, we can't display any catalog content on the Contoso website.

 

 

About crawled and managed properties

During a crawl, the contents and metadata of the items are represented as crawled properties. In our scenario, items are the site columns and the values that are stored in the Products catalog. The reason you need to know about crawled properties, is because we'll later use crawled properties when configuring refiners.

Even though crawled properties contain values, they are "useless" without a partner. This partner is a managed property. By creating a mapping between a crawled property and a managed property, we'll be able to display content on Our Contoso website.

The reason you need to know about managed properties, is because we'll later use managed properties when configuring queries in Search Web Parts, and when defining how search results should be displayed on a web page.

I'll explain both the use of crawled and managed properties in more detail along with examples in later blog articles. For now, it's important that you understand that we'll use crawled and managed properties, and NOT the site columns from the Products catalog when querying for and displaying content on Our Contoso website.

About automatically created crawled and managed properties 

SharePoint comes with a number of default managed properties that are mapped to default crawled properties, for example, “Title”.

In previous versions of SharePoint, whenever a new item was discovered during a crawl, users would have to manually create a new managed property, and map this to the corresponding crawled property.

In SharePoint Server 2013, you can use automatically created crawled and managed properties. They make the lives of catalog owners a lot easier.

When new content is added to a catalog (what we did in Stage 2: Import list content into the Product Catalog Site Collection), a lot of new items will be discovered during a crawl (what we did in Stage 4: Set up search and enable the crawling of your catalog content). To avoid having to create a new managed property, and map this to the corresponding crawled property, SharePoint Server 2013 does this for you. When a catalog's crawled, SharePoint Server 2013 automatically creates a crawled property for each site column in the catalog. SharePoint Server 2013 also automatically creates a managed property for the site column, and adds a mapping between the two.

Important note:
Only site columns that contain values automatically become managed properties when they're crawled.  Regular columns do not!

So, that is a sweet deal!

However, remember how I mentioned that you will use crawled- and managed properties in later stages when configuring refiners and queries in Search Web Parts? Well, in order to do that, it's important that you understand how the names of these automatically created crawled and managed properties are constructed.

 

 

About the naming convention for automatically created crawled and managed properties

The name of an automatically created property is a combination of the site column name, and the site column type.  This naming convention is a tricky area to understand, so I'll start with a simple example, with two site columns, and then I'll explain the rules that apply to all site column types.

Naming convention for two site column types

Naming convention for two site columns

1. In the Products list, we have:

  • A site column named "Contoso Color" of type "Single line of text"
  • A site column named "Contoso Weight" of type "Number"

2. During a crawl, a crawled property is automatically created for the site column. The name of this property is generated by removing spaces from the site column name, and adding a prefix. The prefix that is added varies depending on the site column type.
So, in this example, we get the following crawled properties:

  • ows_q_TEXT_ContosoColor
  • ows_q_NMBR_ContosoWeight

3. A managed property is then automatically created, which is mapped to the corresponding crawled property. The name of this property is generated by removing spaces from the site column name, and adding a suffix. The suffix that is added varies depending on the site column type. 
So, in this example, we get the following managed properties:

  • ContosoColorOWSTEXT
  • ContosoWeightOWSNMBR

That was simple, right? However, the naming convention does vary depending on the site column type. 

Naming convention for all site column types

For the creation of an automatically created crawled property name, the following apply:

  • Spaces are removed from the site column name.
  • For site columns of type Publishing HTML and Multiple line of text, the following prefix is added to the site column  name: ows_r_<four letter code>_
  • For site columns of type Managed Metadata, the following prefix is added to the site column  name: ows_taxId_
  • For all other site column types, the following prefix is added to the site column name: ows_q_<four letter code>_

 

For the creation of an automatically managed property name, the following apply:

  • Spaces are removed from the site column name
  • For site columns of type Managed Metadata, the following prefix is added to the site column name: ows_taxId
  • For all other site column types, the following suffix is added to the site column name: OWS <four letter code>

 

If you need more info, there's an overview table with examples for all site column types in the TechNet article Automatically created managed properties in SharePoint 2013.

So, that might not have been as straightforward as our simple example, and there is one exception to the rule…

Naming convention for the default site columns in the Products list

This exception applies to the six site columns that by default are associated with the Products list in the Product Catalog Site Collection, as shown in the table right below:

Site column name Crawled property name Managed property name
Title Title Title
Item Number ows_q_TEXT_ProductCatalogItemNumber ProductCatalogItemNumberOWSTEXT
Group Number ows_q_TEXT_ProductCatalogGroupNumber  ProductCatalogGroupNumberOWSTEXT
Language Tag ows_q_CHCS_ProductCatalogLanguageTag  ProductCatalogLanguageTagOWSCHCS
Item Category ows_taxId_ProductCatalogItemCategory  owstaxIdProductCatalogItemCategory
Rollup Image ows_r_IMGE_PublishingRollupImage PublishingImage


Now, after all that theory, let's move on and get something concrete done! The real fun will start when I show you how to connect a publishing site to a catalog.  Stay tuned :-)

 

 

Next blog article in this series
Stage 5: Connect your publishing site to a catalog

 

Additional resources