imageThere’s a continuing debate in the IT Pro community whether or not you can host quality content on a wiki. If you don’t know what a wiki is, it’s a platform where anyone can post content and then after the content is posted, anyone can edit it.

Seems like a good idea, since IT Pros can share their collective experience and enhance the content – essentially creating a global “brain trust” that enables the possibility of creating the most comprehensive and most accurate content possible.

Of course, there are other perspectives on the intrinsic value of a wiki that let’s everyone edit documents. The following video embodies this sentiment.

Michael Scott on the authoritative nature of unrestricted wiki content

Well, regardless of which end of the wiki debate you might find yourself, one thing is clear – there is a ton of great information on the TechNet wiki now, and the amount and the quality of the content continues to grow.

Proof of this comes from the recent posting of the Forefront Threat Management Gateway (TMG) 2010 Troubleshooting Survival Guide. Yuri Diogenes worked day and night, night and day, for weeks to put together this vital resource that is sure to benefit all TMG firewall administrators. You can find the TMG Troubleshooting Survival Guide over at:

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/forefront-threat-management-gateway-tmg-2010-troubleshooting-survival-guide.aspx

And remember – it’s on the wiki! That means you can add information, correct incorrect information, or even insert comments into the document. Share what you’ve learned about troubleshooting the TMG firewall. We want to you participate because It takes a village to troubleshoot the TMG firewall Winking smile

HTH,

Tom

Tom Shinder
tomsh@microsoft.com
Principal Knowledge Engineer, Microsoft DAIP iX/Identity Management
Anywhere Access Group (AAG)
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