The next window has us configure the operating system, join a domain, set a product key, admin password(recommended) and other settings. In this example I provided server#### for the Identity information, set the OS to 64 Bit Windows Server, and supplied an administrator password. Since Kevin covered this topic in detail in the prior posts we will continue you on. Click next once you have allocated the proper profile or created one.

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Note: Application deployment settings do not apply if you use the template for stand-alone virtual machines that are not part of a service. Click Next.

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Select the OS Compatibility options that best work with the application in the service. Again this is only required when creating cloud services or templates.

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 Note: SQL Server settings do not apply if you use the template for stand-alone virtual machines that are not part of a service. Click Next.

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Select to view the Script if desired, then click Create:

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The Jobs window will display the template creation process status. When the status says Completed we can close the window.

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Back in the main console of VMM, right click the newly made template and click Create Virtual Machine:

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Since we provided a variable for the server name in the profile there is no need to provide one here, click Next:

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This section of the wizard lets you review and change any of the parameters for this particular VM deployment, if no changes are desired click Next:

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Now we have the option of placing the VM on a host of our choice or letting the wizard decide which host is best. Click Next:

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Notice that the wizard presents us with any Hyper-V hosts that belong to this instance of VMM, the status of the host is displayed along with a Rating. The rating is the VMM’s overall view of performance of the Hyper-V host. CPU usage, Memory consumption, Disk I/O, and Network utilization are considered. Select the host and click Next:

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Review the settings provided by the profiles and then click Next:

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Next we need to add a property for this VM which will tell the Hyper-V host whether the VM should be booted up in the event of a host reboot. The bottom selection might be a wiser choice in some datacenters in order to keep retired VMs not yet removed from production from booting up. Click Next: image

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If you wish the VM to start up as soon as it is finished with deployment, select the box and then click Next:

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Your VM is now ready for use once the Jobs window shows a status of Completed:

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 To verify the VM is complete view it in the VMM Console or launch Hyper-V manager and login to the console of the virtual machine:

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We hope you enjoy the series, please check back for the next post soon!

Additional reading: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh882403.aspx