Tim Berners-Lee and the Invention of the World Wide Web

Tim Berners-Lee and the Invention of the World Wide Web

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Sir Timothy John "Tim" Berners-Lee, OM, KBE, FRS, FREng, FRSA (born 8 June 1955[1]), also known as "TimBL", is a British physicist, computer scientist and MIT professor, credited for his invention of the World Wide Web, making the first proposal for it in March 1989.[2] On 25 December 1990, with the help of Robert Cailliau and a young student at CERN, he implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet.

Berners-Lee is the director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversaw the Web's continued development. He is also the founder of the World Wide Web Foundation, and is a senior researcher and holder of the 3Com Founders Chair at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).[3] He is a director of The Web Science Research Initiative (WSRI),[4] and a member of the advisory board of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence.[5][6] In 2004, Berners-Lee was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his pioneering work.[7] In April 2009, he was elected as a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences, based in Washington, D.C.[8][9]

 

This NeXT Computer was used by Berners-Lee at CERN and became the world's first web server.

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  • Tim Berners-Lee was born in London, England, on 8 June 1955, the son of Conway Berners-Lee and Mary Lee Woods. He attended Sheen Mount primary school, and then went on to Emanuel School in London, from 1969 to 1973. He studied at The Queen's College, Oxford, from 1973 to 1976, where he received a first-class degree in Physics.

  • Hi John - what an awesome story. where did you take it from?

  • Im not really james jayce

  • You know who I am

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