There Is No “I” in Team But There At Least Needs to Be A Couple of People

There Is No “I” in Team But There At Least Needs to Be A Couple of People

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Welcome to the new year of System Center blog posts.

Scanning the many predictions for 2008 from various analysts, press and bloggers I can’t help but notice the sheer number of references to a staffing crisis in IT.  (I saw this issue play out in detail while working at Business Objects – customer’s projects were stalling as the available business intelligence skills became scarce and expensive.) This is a topic that keeps coming back and has deeper issues attached to it than can legitimately addressed in a blog on management software.  However, I do think that it points to issues that our community can have an impact on.

Research shows that about 70% of IT budget (and thus effort) is spent on maintenance activity – fixing and keeping what we have today up and running.  So what does that have to do with System Center and a potential IT skills shortage?  My hypothesis is that if we can automate as many as possible of the high value but low excitement tasks of keeping datacenters and desktops up and running, we not only get all the benefits of cost savings, improved availability, better security etc., but we also allow IT professionals to move onto the activities they actually enjoy. IT gets to do more cool stuff and less dull stuff. That way we don’t lose experience, knowledge, and excellent people to other professions. 

Not exactly “management software: saving IT departments one career at a time” but I’ve always felt that the benefits of software should be viewed in more than costs or revenue.  The outcome here: integrated service management with built in process and best practice just keeps getting more important.


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