Simon May

Client and cloud

What concerns IT Pros about moving applications Azure?

What concerns IT Pros about moving applications Azure?

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I’ve just come off of a really  interesting call and this question is floating around in my head.  I think I know the answers, but please get in touch in the comments, it’s a chance to get involved with shaping how we think about Azure and the IT Pro.

The top 10 things I’ve heard are:

  1. “I loose control of my application and I’m not sure about that”
  2. “I loose control of my data and I’m not sure about that”
  3. “I can’t easily report the status off my applications, are they hitting SLA?”
  4. “I just don’t see how we get there, it means redeveloping our applications”
  5. “I’m not sure I trust Microsoft”
  6. “In not sure I trust the other people on the platform”
  7. “Microsoft doesn’t offer virtual machines in the cloud”
  8. “The cloud is too new, Microsoft’s offerings aren’t mature enough”
  9. “It’s too expensive, the costs are out of my control”
  10. “It’s too hard for my users to connect”

So I’m really interested as to what you think, if it’s one of the above reasons or something else let me know, I’m going to be interviewing two of the Azure General Managers over the coming weeks and I can put concerns to them an get answers.

Comments
  • It's all about loss of control and the loss of physical access to the server/ desktop where their data resides

  • I think the single biggest obstacle for adoption is that you pay for a VM instance regardless of traffic. I deal with startups and SMBs, and their main concern is that they have to pay regardless of whether their website has traffic or not - it forces them to budget big even before they know if they new idea is going to succeed. A pricing model similar to that offered by Google App Engine would really help Azure take off.

  • I think the single biggest obstacle for adoption is that you pay for a VM instance regardless of traffic. I deal with startups and SMBs, and their main concern is that they have to pay regardless of whether their website has traffic or not - it forces them to budget big even before they know if they new idea is going to succeed. A pricing model similar to that offered by Google App Engine would really help Azure take off.

  • The main concern for me being an admin for 10+ years is security, with a physical enviroment you can guarantee that your data isn't on a co-located disk with someone elses data, being part of a law firm this is key for our business.

    The other issue that concerns adoption of the Azure platform is guaranteed bandwidth, again with a physical enviroment you get what you pay for, you buy 10Gb switches you get 10Gb throughput, you put your systems in an Azure cloud, you have our network latency, internet latency, and cloud network latency to contend with, all of which generally leads to lots of finger pointing... when you get an issue with a slow application.

    Also applications outside of the Microsoft offering are not necessarily cloud ready so your essentially running 2 desktop enviroments to run all the apps you can run on a single physical network.

  • Again the issue is cost. I have a few low traffic sites at present hosted on a VM. It would be great to host them on Azure and not have to do any of the system admin / patching etc. Unfortunately Azure is too expensive to use compared to most hosts out there. The costs should be closer to shared or VM hosting.

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