Mapping ITIL/MOF Change Management process to the features of the System Center Service Manager Part 2

Mapping ITIL/MOF Change Management process to the features of the System Center Service Manager Part 2

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In my last blog post, I covered the first process in the MOF Change and Configuration SMF called “Baseline the configuration”. Today, I’ll pick-up where I left off and cover the next process, “Initiating the Change.”

 

Figure 1 shows the MOF Change and Configuration Management service management function (SMF) processes.

 

Figure 1. MOF Change and Configuration Management SMF diagram

 

Figure 2 shows “Initiate the Change” were you use Service Manager to open a change request, define the configuration items that are affected by or related to the change request, identify people or groups that might affected, and what a measurement of risk related to the change. Depending on how you initiate the change, Service Manager might combine some the ITIL/MOF steps in a single step. All the activities involved in initiating a change are performed by the Change Initiator or Change Manager.

   


Figure 2. Initiate the Change diagram

 

 

Figure 3. Change Request form, General Tab

 

Process 2: Initiate the Change – Opening a change request and specifying what will be affected

 

 

1.       Initiate an RFC – This activity can is performed to initiate a request for change (RFC) by opening a change request form (see figure 3). In this step you also enter the Change description, Reason for the change, and Change results in the form. You can do this in a couple of ways:

 

The most efficient way can open a change request from is from viewing any configuration item or work item and automatically associating that item with the new change request. Services, computers, printers, software, and knowledge articles are all configuration items. They all can be linked to the change request and are identified as Configuration items to change, as shown in the figure. Using this method combines “Initiating the RFC” and “Checking the technical configuration” in one step.

 

Another way you can open is a change request is navigate in to Work Items, and drill into Change Management and then creating a new change request. By using the second method, you will have to manually have to choose the configuration items to change in the next step.

 

2.       Check the technical configuration – This is the step where you manually choose the configuration items that are affected by the change request. If you have already associated configuration items in the previous step, then you have already covered this step. Choose the Configuration items to change in the form.

 

3.       Check the business process application configuration – This is the step were you specify the people or groups that are affected by the change request. Choose the People to notify in the form.

 

4.       Identify the business impact and assess the risk – This is the step where you specify any services that are affected by the change and where you assess the impact and risk of the change. Choose the Impact in the form and under Configuration items to change, choose any business service.

 

In my next post I’ll describe how you use Service Manager to satisfy the MOF Change and Configuration SMF process, “Classify the Change”.

 

Note: This blog post and diagram apply to the Beta1 Refresh version of Service Manager. This information might change in subsequent versions of Service Manager.

 

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