Retiring Oclist.exe

Retiring Oclist.exe

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For those of you that used Server Core in Windows Server 2008 you may be familiar with the Oclist.exe tool. This tool was included in Server Core to provide a way to obtain a list of roles and features on Server Core and their installation state. In Windows Server 2008 R2 a new tool, Dism.exe, was introduced for adding/removing roles and features and included the capability to provide the list of roles and features as well as installation state by running:

Dism /online /get-features /format:table

In the Server Core documentation we changed to using Dism.exe for Windows Server 2008 R2. Because Dism.exe is an integrated command line tool for all tasks related to optional roles and features and provides additional formating options for its output, in the next release we are planning to remove Oclist.exe from Server Core.

If there are any concerns with this change, please post a comment or email srvcfdbk@microsoft.com.

Comments
  • What about OCsetup.exe command? is it still available on Server Core R2?

  • Yes, OCsetup.exe is still available on Server Core 2008 R2.

  • What about establishing a command line standard and staying with it. Over time this will give MS more loyalty. Having to learn a new set of commands with each major release is a major pain in the script.

  • Oclist is still available on Windows Server Core 2008 R2 but NOT on Windows Server Core 2012 /2012 R2. Ocsetup is deprecated. Microsoft recommends using DISM.exe to add/remove roles & features in Windows 2012 (R2) Server.

  • +1. Seems I have to learn the new/current way of doing things in Microsoft - as well as all the deprecated ways if I ever want break-in to the inner circle of users who can comfortably operate these needlessly complicated OSs... I certainly hope Linux will dominate in the near future so we can be done with these Goons from Redmond. How many billionaires do we need to keep rewarding for their inferior software and their stranglehold on the world's computers?

    Curmudge0n 21 Jun 2012 5:34 PM
    What about establishing a command line standard and staying with it. Over time this will give MS more loyalty. Having to learn a new set of commands with each major release is a major pain in the script.

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