Im in ur noun, verb-ing ur related noun

Im in ur noun, verb-ing ur related noun

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funny pictures

When people with too much time on their hands dissect a fake language...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lolcat

These images usually consist of a photo of a cat with a large caption characteristically formatted in an uppercase sans serif font such as Impact or Arial Black.[8] The image is, on occasion, digitally edited for effect. The caption generally acts as a speech balloon encompassing a comment from the cat, or as a description of the depicted scene. The caption is intentionally written with deviations from standard English spelling and syntax,[8] featuring "strangely-conjugated verbs, but [a tendency] to converge to a new set of rules in spelling and grammar."[9] These altered rules of English have been referred to as a type of pidgin[8] or baby talk.[1] The text parodies the grammar-poor patois stereotypically attributed to Internet slang. Frequently, lolcat captions take the form of snowclones in which nouns and verbs are replaced in a phrase.[1] Some phrases have a known source[10] while others seem to be specific to the lolcat form. Common themes include jokes of the form "Im in ur noun, verb-ing ur related noun."[11] "I has a noun" pictures show a cat in possession of an object while "Invisible noun" show pictures of cats apparently interacting with said invisible object.[11] "My noun, let me show you it/them" pictures are accompanied by cats apparently presenting or offering an object. Another common lolcat displays a cat with a specific look, which is described by adjective, and the text, "[adjective] cat is not [adjective]"[citation needed] or "Your offering pleases [adjective] cat." A version of this is also stated as "adjective cat is not amused", or "[adjective] cat has run out of [adjective]" (when the cat in related picture seems to be feeling the opposite of the adjective used to describe it.)

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