.NET goes open source?

.NET goes open source?

  • Comments 1
  • Likes

 image

Well, not open source per se, but courtesy of Scott Guthrie's Blog:

One of the things my team has been working to enable has been the ability for .NET developers to download and browse the source code of the .NET Framework libraries, and to easily enable debugging support in them.

Today I'm excited to announce that we'll be providing this with the .NET 3.5 and VS 2008 release later this year.

We'll begin by offering the source code (with source file comments included) for the .NET Base Class Libraries (System, System.IO, System.Collections, System.Configuration, System.Threading, System.Net, System.Security, System.Runtime, System.Text, etc), ASP.NET (System.Web), Windows Forms (System.Windows.Forms), ADO.NET (System.Data), XML (System.Xml), and WPF (System.Windows).  We'll then be adding more libraries in the months ahead (including WCF, Workflow, and LINQ).  The source code will be released under the Microsoft Reference License (MS-RL).

You'll be able to download the .NET Framework source libraries via a standalone install (allowing you to use any text editor to browse it locally).  We will also provide integrated debugging support of it within VS 2008.

More information (including screenshots) after the jump.

Comments
  • Beijing on June 10 morning news, according to Bloomberg survey report GTM Research and the American Solar Energy Industries Association released the first quarter of this year, US home solar power system capacity increase of 76% over last year, to 437 megawatts (MW) ,Solar Batteries http://www.poweroak.net the nation's new generating capacity, more than half of which is a photovoltaic power generation. The report shows that a quarter of the US solar power capacity by 1.3 gigawatts (GW), the sixth consecutive quarterly increase of over 1 GW. The total annual installed capacity is expected to reach 7.9 GW, Solar Power Penerator http://www.poweroak.net , Solar Power Pack http://www.poweroak.net representing an increase of 27%.
    The report predicts that by 2016 solar power will meet the electricity needs of about 800 million households in the United States to offset 45 million metric tons of carbon emissions, equivalent to removing 10 million cars. energy storage system http://www.poweroak.net/energy-storage-system-c-1.html

Your comment has been posted.   Close
Thank you, your comment requires moderation so it may take a while to appear.   Close
Leave a Comment