As you have noted by now, Project Siena can be used to build some surprisingly powerful experiences – still without any programming, and still within a few hours. Here is one more example.

Today, there are plenty of apps that will show you fashion and style videos. Many other apps that will let you explore a product catalog. And yet others that will let you collage or ensemble product photos to create a look. Now, imagine all of these in one fluid experience – watch a style maven on video, see products come up as you watch, choose an item you like and get suggestions to complete the look, keep any suggestion or discard it. Let’s call this Dress by Video.

Check out the sample Dress by Video app at http://aka.ms/ProjectSienaDressByVideo.

Launch the app, watch any of the style guides featuring fictionally famous fashion expert Millie McCall.


As the video plays, the items Millie raves about show up on the right.


Touch an item, get suggestions to complete the look. Don't like what you see, just go back to continue watching Millie, find something else there that will lead to a better choice of outfits.


There is more in the app, try it out. Open the Siena document file at http://aka.ms/ProjectSienaDressByVideo to see how the sample app was built -- not that hard, right? With the pictures and data in place, the author was able to build this app in under a day. 

Single, standalone product selection has been long done. This is the era of more sophisticated and valuable choices, combinations and ensembles, and matching and arranging. In this more complex world, video guides bring simplicity. But videos aren't just for passive watching -- it shouldn't be like here's the video, now load up all this knowledge in your head, now go back to the product catalog. It is really important to tie the video's progress to the rest of the app's data and logic. I'm sure you can now imagine a whole host of apps that make your beautifully produced videos truly come alive -- clothes, furniture, cosmetics, even food. Think recipe preparation videos linked to ingredients, the ability to tweak quantities or substitute, and ultimately a grocery list intelligently generated.

Of course, don't stop at retail products. What about how-to apps for exercise and healthy living? Or math and science tutor apps with guidance and interactivity beyond what the student sees in the video?