When designing Lync Server 2010 topologies there are multiple options available for deploying a Monitoring Server and an Archiving Server. Lync Server 2010 server roles, as well as their databases, can be collocated. Collocation improves network efficiency, increases flexibility, and reduces hardware costs. This article explores several alternatives to consider when deploying a Monitoring Server or an Archiving Server.

Author: Byron Spurlock

Publication date: January 31, 2012

Product version: Lync Server 2010

During a recent Lync Server 2010 deployment, a customer who wanted to deploy Archiving Server and Monitoring server asked; “What scenarios and options are available to us beyond the basics?” This is great question and it inspired me to write this article. This article describes Lync Server 2010, Archiving Server and Lync Server 2010, Monitoring Server topologies that are beyond the basic topologies used for typical scenarios.

To answer the question about additional scenarios and options, we will look at the following areas:

  • What are the core topologies?
  • What are the collocation topologies?

Core Supported Topologies

In the core topologies for Lync Server 2010, the Archiving Server and Monitoring Server are each deployed on separate servers, as described in the following two sub-sections.

Archiving Server Topologies

You can deploy an Archiving Server in each Lync Server 2010, Standard Edition server and Front End pool in your organization or you can deploy a single Archiving Server to support multiple Standard Edition servers and Front End pools. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the core topologies for each of these options.

Figure 1. Archiving Server supporting a single Standard Edition server or Front End pool.

Figure 2. Archiving Server supporting multiple Standard Edition servers or Front End pools.

Monitoring Server Topologies

Similar to the Archiving Server, you can deploy a Monitoring Server in each Lync Server 2010, Standard Edition server and Front End pool in your organization or you can deploy a single Monitoring Server to support multiple Standard Edition servers and Front End pools. Figures 3 and 4 show the core topologies for each option.

Figure 3. Monitoring Server supporting a single Standard Edition Server or Front End pool.

Figure 4. Monitoring Server supporting multiple Standard Edition servers or Front End pools.

Collocation Topologies

To reduce hardware costs for your Lync Server 2010 deployment, you can deploy multiple components on a single server. Lync Server 2010 supports a variety of collocation scenarios, as described in the following sub-sections.

Note: To determine whether to collocate server roles and databases, you must evaluate scalability and reliability factors. If you are supporting more than a few users, the disk space needed by the database can grow very large. For details about capacity planning, see the Lync Server 2010 documentation.

Separate Archiving Server and Monitoring Server. In this scenario, the Archiving Server and the Monitoring Server each reside on separate servers. The Monitoring and Archiving database both reside on a single SQL Server database. If you collocate the Archiving database with the Monitoring database, back-end database, or both of these databases, you can either use a single SQL instance for any or all of the databases, or you can use a separate SQL instance for each database, with the following limitations:

  • Each SQL instance can contain only a single back-end database, single Monitoring database, and single Archiving database.
  • The database server cannot support more than one Front End pool, one Archiving database, and one Monitoring database, but it can support one of each, regardless of whether the databases use the same SQL instance or separate SQL instances.

Figure 5 shows the topology where all Lync databases are collocated on a single server, with databases collocated on another server. This topology might be appropriate for an organization that has a significant number of users, wants to capture reports for Archiving and Monitoring, and wants to separate both roles, in order to handle the maximum number of users, but wants to reduce the hardware required. Although each role resides on a separate server, the databases can run on either a dedicated or existing SQL server.

Figure 5. Archiving Server and Monitoring Server running on separate servers with databases collocated on another server.

Archiving Server and Monitoring Server collocated on the same server with databases collocated on another server. Figure 6 shows a topology where the Archiving Server and Monitoring Server are collocated on the same server, with databases running on another server. This topology might be appropriate for an organization that wants to reduce the hardware requirements and does not have many users and has archiving requirements for only a portion of the organization.

Figure 6. Archiving Server and Monitoring Server collocated on a single server with databases collocated on another server.

Archiving Server, Monitoring Server, and their databases collocated on a single server. Figure 7 shows a topology where the Archiving Server and Monitoring server are collocated on the same server, with databases running an another server. This topology might be appropriate for an organization that wants to reduce hardware requirements and does not have many users and has minimal archiving requirements.

Figure 7. Archiving Server, Monitoring Server, and their databases collocated on a single server.

Archiving Server and Monitoring Server running on separate servers with databases deployed on a cluster of Back End Servers. Figure 8 shows a high-availability topology in which the Archiving Server and Monitoring Server each reside on separate servers and the databases are part of a two node active – passive cluster. This topology might be appropriate for an organization in which archiving and monitoring are mission critical. Being deemed mission critical, the related databases must be available in the event of a disaster. This is accomplished by using an active-passive cluster to help ensure that the database remains available if a Back End Server node becomes unresponsive or unavailable.

Figure 8. Archiving Server and Monitoring Server running on separate servers with a SQL Server cluster.

5. Monitoring Server or Archiving Server collocated with the databases. Figure 9 shows a topology in which the Archiving Server runs on a separate server and the Monitoring Server is collocated on the server running the databases. The server roles could also be reversed, with the Monitoring Server running on a separate server and the Archiving Server collocated with the databases. This topology might be appropriate for an organization that anticipates significantly lower volume for either Monitoring Server or Archiving Server. In this case the server role with the highest anticipated traffic is on the separate server.

Figure 9. Archiving Sever running on a separate server and Monitoring Server collocated with the databases.

Summary

When creating or upgrading a Lync Server 2010 environment to include an Archiving Server, Monitoring Server, or both, consider using one of the collocation topologies. Collocation of server roles and databases takes advantage of the Lync Server 2010 collocation capabilities to meet the needs of your organization and maximize your hardware resources. For more information about collocation support in Lync Server 201, see Supported Server Collocation in the Supportability documentation.

Additional Resources

Lync Server Resources

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