Microsoft Malware Protection Center

Threat Research & Response Blog

Ten years ago, Bill Gates sent a companywide memo stating that Microsoft must make trustworthy computing the highest priority for the company and for the industry over the next decade. He predicted computing would become an integral and indispensable part of almost everything that people do. Bill recognized that Microsoft and the technology industry needed to prioritize security, privacy, and availability to instill trust in computing.

As the landscape continues to change, this 10 year milestone provides an opportunity to reflect on the past and prepare for the future.

Did you know that there were 15 sessions Microsoft participated in this year. For the full lineup, click here.
 

Scott Charney at RSA Conference 2012

Today, in conjunction with his keynote at RSA Conference 2012, Scott Charney, Corporate Vice President, Trustworthy Computing, released an updated TwC whitepaper, “Trustworthy Computing Next,” looking at some of the significant drivers of change within the computing industry and how Trustworthy Computing must continue to evolve.

For more details, see Scott's blog post and watch the keynote.

 

Trust in Computing Research

The “Trust in Computing” research was conducted in nine countries around the world; the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Russia, India and China. Questions were asked on the Internet, devices, security, privacy, reliability, Cybersecurity representing use, experiences and perceptions.

Scott Charney made a reference in his keynote to 92.5 percent of respondents believe cybercrime laws need updating. This was one of the many findings of the research.

For more details, see the blog post and keep following as we release more data in the coming months.

 

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years

Today Jeff Jones and Tim Raines presented at RSA 2012, providing information about the changing global threat landscape of exploits, vulnerabilities, and malware. They introduced a special edition of the SIR provides summarized information about how malware (and other forms of potentially unwanted software) has evolved over the last 10 years. The special edition of the Security Intellegence Report (SIR) can be downloaded here.

For more details, see the blog post series referenced in the presentation:

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years - Part 1

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years - Part 2

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years - Part 3

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years - Part 4

Trustworthy Computing: Learning About Threats for Over 10 Years - Part 5

 

For further information and resources on TwC Next, visit the Trustworthy Computing web site.