Microsoft Malware Protection Center

Threat Research & Response Blog

May, 2012

  • A technical analysis of Adobe Flash Player CVE-2012-0779 Vulnerability

    Recently, we've seen a few attacks in the wild targeting a patched Adobe Flash Player vulnerability. The vulnerability related to this malware was addressed with a recent patch released by Adobe on May 4th. On the Windows platform, Flash Player 11.2.202.233 and earlier is vulnerable. If you're using vulnerable version, you need to update your Flash Player now to be protected against these attacks. We had a chance to analyze how the malware (sha1: e32d0545f85ef13ca0d8e24b76a447558614716c) works and...
  • Facebook offers Microsoft Security Essentials as a security solution

    We’re very excited to announce that Microsoft has teamed up with Facebook to offer Windows users free malware protection with Microsoft Security Essentials. Since May 1st, Facebook users have had the choice of downloading and installing Microsoft Security Essentials as their security solution. While there are numerous threats on the Internet, and while there are many things you can do to help prevent your computer from becoming infected, a cornerstone of protection is a strong anti-malware...
  • Dishigy dishes out the DDoS and we dig deeper...

    ‚ÄčThe May edition of the Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool saw the inclusion of two new malware families: Win32/Unruy and Win32/Dishigy . Let's dig a bit deeper into Dishigy and the nature of Denial of Service . So, bear with me while I take you back to security 101… A Denial of Service (DoS) attack is a pretty straightforward concept – an attacker floods or otherwise sends malicious traffic to a targeted system in such a way that the targeted system is not able to respond...
  • Carl A. Someone has many names

    In days of old, a man without a signature would just mark an 'X', but today it seems like there is another, more common, signature. I was doing some work the other day and came across a Word document that had an attachment. It turned out to be a phishing scam but part of the document caught my eye. The signature did not match the name. The name was Dr. Simon Brown and the signature looks like this: The signature was for Carl A. [indecipherable]. This made me wonder if it was just some generic...