YouthSpark #WeSpeakCode Profile: Hassan Tanvir Mansur

YouthSpark #WeSpeakCode Profile: Hassan Tanvir Mansur

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To celebrate coding and programmers, we are highlighting YouthSpark stars in Asia Pacific who have learned to code and have found success in school, competitions and career by understanding this language. We hope their stories will inspire you. What are you waiting for? Learn to speak Code now. #WeSpeakCode.

imageName: Hassan Tanvir Mansur
Country: Bangladesh
Occupation: Freelancer

Bio: Despite having a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) from American International University-Bangladesh, Hassan Tanvir Mansur’s pursuits go far beyond the business realm. Habouring a burning passion for technology, Tanvir has created a wide range of applications ranging from simple games to comprehensive information guides, and used to be a Microsoft Student Partner. Also an avid photographer, the 23-year-old has journeyed to countries including England, Nepal, Bhutan, France and Malaysia, in search for pristine landscapes to hone his craft. He is also a huge fan of cricket and football. Relentlessly pursuing greater heights, Tanvir’s biggest dream is to land a job at Microsoft’s headquarters in Washington DC.

Can you describe a few projects in coding that you have done?
Most of my recent projects have been applications and games on the Windows Phone, such as:

  • Lumia 520 App - This app was created with App Studio, and features tutorials to help Lumia 520 users understand how to use the phone and to take them through its unique features.
  • Nail Art - Nail Art consolidates tutorials for users—specifically teenage girls—who want to keep up with nail design.
  • ‘Macro Photography’ and ‘Landscape Photography’ - These two apps retrieved information like video tutorials to help photographers improve their techniques.

I have a broad range of interests like aviation, nature, football, television and culture, and have created apps around these topics.

Tell us about your experience in technology, especially in learning to code.  
It all began in 2000, when my parents gave me my first desktop computer, which ran on Windows 98—the most famous operating system at that time. Since then, I’ve been fascinated with Microsoft technology. I love to learn about new technologies, so I applied to be a Microsoft Student Partner (MSP) to immerse myself in technology. After I became an MSP in 2011, I participated in many events and had the chance to speak at the tech seminar TechFire. To advance my skills, I started to develop Windows Phone apps in 2013, using Visual Studio and Windows App Studio.

I relied a lot on Microsoft Software Development Network (MSDN) blogs for guidance and ideas. My learning curve was the steepest when I interned at Microsoft Bangladesh in App Development Support, where the Tech Evangelist Mr. Tanzim Saqib taught me a lot about developing for Windows Phone apps. He was the one who inspired me to develop games.

Microsoft is having a We Speak Code campaign to encourage young people to learn code. If you were to speak to the younger generation, what kind of advice would you give them? 
Coding is fun! Trust me on that. Not only will it help you understand technology better, the logic training helps improve problem-solving skills, an increasingly essential trait for this generation. A word of advice: take your coding lessons at a slower pace; treat it like a hobby or pastime, and you’ll find yourself learning more when pressure and stress is absent.

Most importantly, always take the initiative to discover and learn. As a novice photographer, I would visit Flickr, to view the EXIF data of the photos I admired. The EXIF data gives the full details of the camera settings used for the pictures (ISO, exposure, focal length etc.) With that, I could analyse and internalise the concepts and their techniques. I find that you learn faster that way, instead of learning from peers or tutors. Nowadays, with so many resources on the Internet, learning on your own has never been easier, be sure to leverage that, and learn as much as possible!

I’m inspired by Bill Gates! 

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