Today, we’re inviting consumers to break the Google habit and take part in the Bing it On Challenge.

Based on research that indicates people prefer Bing web search results over Google, the Bing it On Challenge is a fun, non-scientific online test designed to show that the quality of Bing’s web search results has surpassed Google’s.

Here’s how it works – go to Bingiton.com and conduct five search queries of your choice and compare unbranded web search results from Bing and Google side by side. For each search result, you choose a winner or declare it a “draw.” Next the test shows you which search engine came out on top and lets you share the Bing It On Challenge with others via Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

To get the word out, we’re launching a nationwide campaign to encourage searchers to give Bing a chance. You’ll see a new TV ad during the MTV Video Music Awards. The ads will appear on TV and online over the coming months.

We had a little fun doing the blind taste-tests with people on the street. Even in San Francisco, with people who claimed to prefer Google, the results were striking – people chose Bing’s web search results over Google! Now, obviously, your mileage may vary… But the bottom line is that web search result relevance is no longer a reason for people to choose Google over Bing. In fact, for a majority of people, web search result relevance would be a reason to pick Bing over Google. 

People can still disagree over whether they prefer a user interface with a stunning new photograph every day or a blank white user interface that occasionally includes ads for Google products (indeed, it sounds like they have debated that very question in Mountain View from time to time ). But web search result relevance is no longer a differentiator between Google and Bing. Bing’s web search results are as good, if not better, than Google’s.

If you want to learn more about Bing it On, read this Bing Search Blog post from Mike Nichols, corporate vice president and chief marketing officer, and this press release over on the Microsoft News Center.

Posted by Frank X. Shaw
Corporate Vice President, Corporate Communications, Microsoft