For those of you not familiar with the acronym, VDI stands for Virtual Desktop Infrastructure.  The idea is that I can provide my users their desktops via remote desktop connections…

“Like Terminal Services?”

An example of a NON-virtual desktop...Where have you been since 2007?  But, in a sense, yes.  Using the same (or a similar) remote desktop protocol connection, and from a simple (or even “thin”) client, a user can access a computing desktop – whether all their own or shared.  But in this case, instead of a user session on a Remote Desktop Session Host (you’d call it a Terminal Server), the user is connecting to a virtual machine running a desktop operating system. 

“Oh yeah.. I’ve heard of that.  I’ve considered it, but it is complex.”

It’s certainly not something you enter into lightly.  And we still suggest that you consider partners such as Citrix to add value to the implementation.  But the good news is that in Windows Server 2012 we make it much easier to configure, manage, and support a VDI infrastructure.

“’VDI Infrastructure’?  Isn’t that redundant?”

Shut up.

Today’s “31 Days of our Favorite Things” article comes to you by my friend Brian Lewis.  He will give you all the details on how to set up VDI using Windows Server 2012 and, oh, about 11 mouse clicks.

READ HIS EXCELLENT ARTICLE HERE

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Are you considering VDI as a way to centrally provide and manage user desktops for some segment of your workforce?  Are you already doing this?  Share your experiences, or ask your questions, in the comments.