One of my favorite features in Essential Business Server is one that simply lets the IT Administrator help his/her users without having to leave his/her desk.  You might be saying, "well duh, Remote Assistance has been a feature in Windows client since the XP version", I've met with lots of Administrators who don't use it because the user either has to initiate the request or find some somewhat buried information in order for the Admin to initiate RA.  As a result, they typically use other 3rd party tools (not mentioned here for fear of a corporate flogging <g>), Remote Desktop which unfortunately completely takes over the KVM so the user cannot see what they're doing, or <gasp> they get up and walk to the user's desk/computer!   

Essential Business Server makes the need for those needless workarounds (although some are at least "aerobic") go by the wayside.  In essence, Essential Business Server leverages a Group Policy Object change (see image) that System Center Essentials makes and leverages its own Computer and Devices page (again, see image).  The combination of the two Essential Business Server features let the IT Administrator connect to the user's PC from his/her own computer (at work or at home) while letting the see what they're doing.  Since (typically) >50% of the IT Administrator's day is spent helping the users this feature should really help them get more done especially if the users are remote.    

Starting Remote Assistance from EBS' Administration Console

 

Remote Assistance GPO

Starting Remote Assistance from EBS' Administration Console

Remote Assistance GPO

Preparing the PCs for Remote Assistance

The best way to prepare your company's computers to utilize Remote Assistance in Essential Business Server is to name them something associated with the user (where appropriate).  This can be a non-trivial change because as you know Netbios requirements stipulate that each computer name must be unique.  That's why its not uncommon to see all kinds of crazy names for PCs none of which make the names even remotely easy to determine who actually is using the computer (my favorite: the NIC's MAC address).  Inside of Microsoft because we have hundreds of thousands of computers, most users (but not all) name their PC Username-ComputerType (e.g. KentcLaptop) or some similar combination.  I recommend that you do this too because doing so will make it really easy for you to look up the user's PC name from the Computers and Devices list when they call you on the phone.  It also lets you know which computer has a file locked right before you kill its connection to the server so you can call them.  Confession: I used to do this with MS Mail in order to start a server backup.  Unfortunately, back then there was simply no way to give the user on PC "HQ-NF-12032" a head's up that they might just want to send that email they've been working on for an hour before we terminated their connection. Good times, good times. <g>