Microsoft MVP Kevin Goff is doing a 13 part SQL 2012 Live Online webcast series. They are being recorded  so I have gotten permission to put all 13 of the recordings here on my one blog post.

 

The original webcast series post can be found here:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/jweston/archive/2012/03/06/free-online-training-the-baker-s-dozen-13-part-live-webcast-series-on-sql-server-2012-starting-march-23rd-june-15th.aspx

 

Part 1 The Baker’s Dozen: What’s New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 1 of 13)—Using the New Column Store Index

 

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Have you ever purchased or upgraded to a product because of one major, killer function? The new column store index in Microsoft SQL Server 2012 might be the one feature that convinces managers of SQL Server data warehouses to upgrade. Based on the VertiPaq technology that’s already found in Microsoft PowerPivot, the new column store index can increase the performance of data warehousing queries by a factor of 10 or more. That’s beyond significant! In this webcast, I show scenarios where you can create column store indexes and view the statistics and performance of queries with (and without) them.

 

Part 2 The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 2 of 13): New Transact-SQL Enhancements

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Each new version of Microsoft SQL Server contains a number of language enhancements for retrieval, summarizing, and management of data. SQL Server 2005 had new features for PIVOT, RANK, recursive queries, and more. SQL Server 2008 had GROUPING SETS, MERGE, and more. Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2012 offers several new features to help application developers and database administrators, with capabilities such as sequence objects (a database-level identity), new window functions for analytic queries (such as LAG, LEAD, Percent Rank, Cumulative Distance, and a new way to calculate MEDIANS), new ways of paging through result sets (with new OFFSET and FETCH keywords), and more. In this webcast, Kevin Goff goes through a series of code samples to illustrate scenarios where these new language features can be used.

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 3 of 13): New FileTable Enhancement

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In Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Microsoft released the new FileStream feature and the new HierarchyID data type. Some people wanted to use this to build (among other things) hierarchical document management features in SQL Server. But, Microsoft has added a new feature in SQL Server 2012 to make this process much easier. The new FileTable feature is a mechanism that lets you map a folder or file system structure to a special database table, where SQL Server maintains a relationship dynamically. In this webcast, Kevin Goff builds a simple but meaningful example from beginning to end. The end result will be standard DML statements against the FileTable, which will automatically affect the contents of the basic document management example.

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 4 of 13):  New Capabilities in SQL Server 2012 Integration Services

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Since Microsoft SQL Server 2005, SQL Server Integration Services has been a good tool for ETL (Extract, Transform, and Load) scenarios. Microsoft made SQL Server 2012 Integration Services "a whole lot better." SQL Server 2012 Integration Services adds new features to the user interface to improve the learning curve for new developers and new functions that will be a hit with experienced ETL developers. In this webcast, I go through many of the new features in SQL Server 2012 Integration Services, such as shared connection managers, new parameter capabilities, improved ways for the data flow pipeline to handle changes to metadata, and the new deployment features that make it easier for administrators to manage Integration Services packages on the database server.

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 5 of 13): New Capabilities in SQL Server 2012 Integration Services (Continued)

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The new features in Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Integration Services are great. But many people ask the (very good) question—what is so great about Integration Services? Why should someone use it, and what advantages does it provide over, for instance, writing extract jobs using custom Transact-SQL and Microsoft .NET code?
In this webcast, I walk through a full example of an Integration Services extract job by using some of the new features in SQL Server 2012 Integration Services. The example gives attendees a chance to see a working example of an Integration Services solution for a data warehousing scenario and also how to incorporate custom Transact-SQL code/stored procedures and C# scripts into the process.

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 6 of 13): An Overview of the New BISM and Microsoft's View for Business Intelligence

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For several years, there was one way to create analytic databases in the Microsoft world—create OLAP cubes in Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services for users to "slice and dice" data. While that path is still alive and well, Microsoft has established other paths and approaches for creating business intelligence database solutions.
While these new approaches are intended to be a little easier than using Analysis Services, there is still a learning curve—not just on these new features (a.k.a. the new "tabular" model, PowerPivot 2.0, etc.), but also on how all the new pieces fit. In this case, all the pieces fit into the overall business intelligence paradigm (which includes OLAP) called the Microsoft Business Intelligence Semantic Model (BISM).
In this webcast, we look at the new BISM and the different roadmaps that Microsoft has provided for creating business intelligence applications in SQL Server 2012. This is a general webcast that provides a "what's what" in the new BISM. It paves the way for subsequent webcasts where we look at the details of the tabular model and PowerPivot 2.0.

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 7 of 13): What's New in the Tabular Model

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Although Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services has tremendous capabilities for building analytic (OLAP) databases, the learning curve can intimidate developers. The new tabular model in Analysis Services provides developers with some of the same general features as the regular multidimensional capabilities of OLAP, but in a somewhat simplified user interface. In this webcast, we create an analytic database by using the tabular model in Microsoft Visual Studio (SQL Server Data Tools), pointing to a relational database as the source. Because there's still a learning curve with the tabular model, we split this up into two parts. This webcast focuses on the basics of the tabular model (because it's new to many people), and in the second part, we look at some of the more detailed features. If you need a "first look" at what the tabular model offers, this webcast is for you.

 

The Baker's Dozen: What's New in SQL Server 2012 (Part 8 of 13): What's New in the Tabular Model (continued)

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This webcast picks up where the previous part left off: we look at the different specific features in the tabular model, such as key performance indicators (KPIs), roles, partitions, and calculations. We also look at scenarios in which the tabular model works well compared to the traditional OLAP model, scenarios in which the models differ, and ways that we can scale the tabular model (which by default is an in-memory data model) for more enterprise-level applications (by using DirectQuery mode). After this webcast, you should have a better understanding of the tabular model and how it differs from the traditional OLAP, multidimensional model.