Next week I will be delivering a presentation on “A CIFS/SMB/SMBV2 File Server Tool for Capacity Planning and Performance Troubleshooting” during SNIA’s Storage Developer Conference in Santa Clara, CA.
You can see the agenda and some additional details in the public event agenda at http://www.snia.org/events/storage-developer2008/agenda2008.
I can’t disclose any additional information before the event, but the slide deck will eventually be posted on the SNIA web site (first to attendees only and later public).

You might be asking yourself: “What is Jose doing in a developer’s conference? Isn’t he focused on IT infrastructure?” Well, true, that is my current focus.
However, I have worked as a Developer before. In fact, I started my career as a COBOL and dBASE programmer back in the 1985.
I also worked on many development projects using MUMPS, Fox Pro, Pascal, Transact-SQL, Visual Basic and C#.

One of the most interesting storage-related development projects I worked on was an application I wrote in 1992 while working for a Brazilian company called Loop Ltd.
Loop manufactures an embedded computer for vehicles (targeted at commercial trucks, buses and fleet vehicles) that works like a plane’s black box.
Sensors provide information about speed, engine rpm, acceleration and brakes (to name a few), which gets stored in non-volatile memory and is later wirelessly transmitted to a PC.
I helped design and develop the initial release of the PC software that collected the device’s data, displayed the information in graphical form and compiled several reports.
That was when I first learned that certain types of non-volatile memory can only be rewritten if first erased (in large blocks at a time) and that you can only do that a certain number of times in their lifetime.
I also had fun parsing the device’s data (originally provided to the PC application as a full memory dump). It looked a lot like a database log, which had to be “rehydrated” on the fly.

But I digress… If you are attending the SDC conference and you are interested in a capacity tool for file servers, I invite you to come over and learn more about what we’re brewing at Microsoft.
If all else fails :-), I can always pass the hard questions to Bartosz Nyczkowski, my co-presenter and a Software Developer Engineer.