Continuing the blogcast series on infrastructure essentials.

Unlucky 13 for some - it certainly was for me, I had to record it three times and still had problems along the way! Oh, the joys of real world "live" computing! Anyway, now that we can send email externally from our Active Directory/Exchange based infrastructure using SMTP, the next steps are to be able to receive email from the Internet. There are a couple of ways open to us to configure this, and the solution generally depends on what services are available to us from our ISP, and whether we might have a static IP address externally. The first solution proposed in this blogcast is akin to a home user who uses an ISP to host their email inbox, and an email client to poll the ISPs server using POP3 (Post Office Protocol).

If you were using Small Business Server 2003, a POP3 solution exists "in-the-box", however, we are using Exchange 2003 directly, and we have to use a utility to perform POP3 polling. There are many utilities out there for this, varying in price, number of mailboxes supported and functionality. Some will include spam checking and anti-virus, for example. However, I chose a very basic free utility to demonstrate what can be done. Along the way, we determine what reconfiguration needs to be done to our ISA server to allow POP3 traffic to traverse our firewall.

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Series Index:

0. Network configuration and series background.
1. Getting started
2. ISA Server configuration to allow basic web browsing capability
3. ISA Firewall Client basic configuration
4. ISA Firewall Client auto-detection through WPAD configuration
5. Configuring an Exchange mailbox and Outlook profile
6. Fixing 0x8004010F on Outlook send/receive
7. Installing our first Certificate Authority
8. Publishing OWA through ISA using Forms Based Authentication
9. OWA /exchange redirection
10. OWA nearly goes SSL - we have a certificate
11. OWA is available over SSL/HTTPS
12. Sending external email - Configuring outbound SMTP