A few weeks back I posted about VMware’s conduct in posting a video which of some tests which appear to bring on a crash in Hyper-V. No company is all good or all bad, not Microsoft, not VMware. But I did say in response to one of the comments

VMware shows all the signs of running scared. The thing is, when you do that you need to watch yourself or you fall in the gutter.

Obviously no organization likes its competitors,we can (and do) respect ours. This incident  has reduced the respect we have for VMware and reading An article on IT-Pro this week it seems we’re not alone.

Over on the virtualization Team’s blog, Jeff has a post about where this has got to: we still can’t get a crash dump out of VMware to give us a fighting chance of reproducing the problem: the tests haven’t come to a conclusion yet and Jeff doesn’t to give a preliminary conclusion – but he does says we haven’t been able to make Hyper-V crash yet but (like the folks at Anandtech point out ) we’ve found quite a lot wrong with the test which supposedly brought it on.

But …an apology has appeared from Scott Drummonds (who was the person responsible). Is it sufficient ? Is it timely ? I’ll let others be the judge of that. But there are youtube users who don’t realise that admitting you got it wrong is the first step in getting people’s respect back – and they could learn from Scott

Update. Jeff has a second post where he talks about the testing we have done where they were able to get the guest to crash. It turns out to be an issue that has less than two dozen reports but was found and fixed in April 2008. It’s not specific to Hyper-V In fact, Jeff  found that VMware reported this issue on ESX. That’s right folks, their anonymous youtube video could have shown ESX crashing as easily as it showed hyper-v.