Get Microsoft Silverlight

The beta version of ChronoZoom released about a year ago, quickly earning the team behind it the SXSW Interactive Award for Best Educational Resource. At this year’s SXSWedu event, curriculum designer David Hunter will present his Zombie-Based Learning Curriculum, as well as the ChronoZoomers Guild project that utilizes ChronoZoom to teach historical thinking in a time-traveling scenario.

As Hunter, self-described “chief survival officer for Zombie-based learning,” explains on the Microsoft Research Connections Blog, the free curriculum he developed teaches historical thinking by immersing students in researching the effects of manipulating history. He’s helped create an original story that complements the curriculum.

“In the story, an organization from the future, known as the ChronoZoomers Guild, is working to prevent historical atrocities for the betterment of future timelines,” Hunter says. “Within the story framework, students create their own timelines by using ChronoZoom to present and support their historical arguments.”

ChronoZoom’s latest release added an authoring tool so that anyone can create timelines and tours inside ChronoZoom. In March 2013, ChronoZoom 2.0 launched, gaining even more traction in the education community. Outside developers have also been building creative applications with ChronoZoom. For instance, a team at the University of Alberta created Dino101, a specialized version of ChronoZoom that focuses on important events in Earth’s geological history. This and other examples confirm the belief that this visualization tool can serve as a great open education resource.

Head over to the Microsoft Research Connections Blog to read more about the ChronoZoom’s developments and SXSW.

You might also be interested in:


Athima Chansanchai
Microsoft News Center Staff