Hyper-V and Failover Clusters

Hyper-V and Failover Clusters

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I've been doing quite a few talks on Hyper-V recently - which if you know me, means a couple of PowerPoint slides and a load of demos.

I've finally gotten around to encoding my demos - so here they are:

First (just so you know there's no smoke and mirrors), I build the cluster:

Click to start, double click anywhere to play it in Full Screen and move your mouse over it to get the Player Controls to pop up.

My cluster is built using three laptops:

Daven-2008 is running Windows Server 2008 and hosts a domain controller and an iSCSI SAN.  The iSCSI Target is offering 31 LUNs (which are VHDs sitting on a 5400rpm external USB drive) to the iSCSI Initiators.  I manage the cluster and Hyper-V from here.  Daven-Node1 & Daven-Node2 are both running Windows Server 2008 - Server Core and are connected to the iSCSI target.

Next, I create a Virtual Machine and make it Highly Available.  I then fail it between nodes, just to show what happens:

Click to start, double click anywhere to play it in Full Screen and move your mouse over it to get the Player Controls to pop up.

And finally, just to dispel the myth that a Microsoft Cluster is limited to 26 drives (one per letter of the alphabet), I do it again:

Click to start, double click anywhere to play it in Full Screen and move your mouse over it to get the Player Controls to pop up.

Hyper-V is just a role that you install onto Windows Server 2008.  It works very closely with Failover Clustering to provide both High Availability and Quick Migration.  Quick Migration, as you can see, is the ability to fail a running Virtual Machine from one physical cluster node to another with very little downtime.

Hyper-V is currently at a Release Candidate stage and will be finished soon (fingers crossed).

Dave

Comments
  • Hi Dave

    Nice demo's, you make them look too easy.

    Anyway quick question on the static MAC address you set up. Did you have one already allocated somewhere (magic Microsoft MAC address handbook), or does Hyper-V have a pool it can call on for these purposes. Similar to how VMware has a range it uses for all virtual machines.

    While I can see setting a static MAC address as a good thing for failover/quick migration, keeping track of, and setting the static MACs up could be a mgmt nightmare if implemented incorrectly.

    Cheers

    David

  • Hyper-V has a pool to allocate as dynamic addresses - I just used the address it allocated when I first started that VM.  I agree, it would be a nightmare - I haven't found anything to say that it's a best practice (it was just something that in my own head makes sense - and does seem to make failover a little more seamless).  I guess we'll just have to wait & see what happens when we RTM..

    Dave.

  • Check this post to see 5 different options for Failover Clustering with Hyper-V:

    http://blogs.technet.com/josebda/archive/2008/06/17/windows-server-2008-hyper-v-failover-clustering-options.aspx

    You can also check this demo of how to setup a cluster with two Hyper-V nodes running a core install of Windows Server 2008:

    http://blogs.technet.com/josebda/archive/2008/04/14/snw-demo-windows-server-2008-core-hyper-v-and-failover-clustering-with-screenshots.aspx

  • Thanks to all those who attended Tuesday night's user group meeting . Apologies for going on a bit (I

  • In this post I’ll talk you through how I have created a Hyper-V Failover Cluster on my single laptop.

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