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A case study on the comparative costs of database administration for two of the premier enterprise relational database management systems; Oracle vs Microsoft

A case study on the comparative costs of database administration for two of the premier enterprise relational database management systems; Oracle vs Microsoft

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In these tough and uncertain economic times lowering operational costs and total cost of ownership (TCO)
has become a crucial factor for IT infrastructure decisions.  While some factors such as purchase price and
annual support are easy to measure, other key costs such as administrative labor are more difficult to
differentiate between technology alternatives.  Considering that on-going administrative costs often make
up 70% of IT budgets, it is critical to measure and assess the alternative management costs between
competing technologies.
This paper discusses the findings from several customer case studies conducted on the costs associate with
managing two of the leading database management platforms from Microsoft Corp. and Oracle®.  This
research was in follow up to an earlier study conducted in 2006, Microsoft SQL Server and Oracle®
Database: A Comparative Study on Total Cost of Administration (TCA), Alinean 2006.  The first study
conducted in-depth interviews with 100 Directors of Database Administration and Senior level Database
Administrators regarding their database environments, user populations, and database administration
activities.  These follow up customer case studies focused on a dozen of the largest organizations to see
how their use of the two database platforms for mission critical applications had changed and how the
database administrative effort to manage these databases had changed.
The customer case studies revealed two major findings.  First, while the use of Oracle databases remained
relatively similar to previous observations, both the number and size of Microsoft SQL Server databases had
increased significantly in the majority of organizations. Second, the difference in Total Cost of
Administration (TCA) became even greater for the two database platforms than in the original study. The
customer case studies demonstrated that on average a Database Administrator (DBA) could manage over
65 mission critical Microsoft SQL Server databases, while Oracle Database implementations required one
DBA per 15 critical databases.  Factoring in slightly higher average salaries for Oracle DBAs, the
corresponding annual cost for administration for these two databases comes out to $1,605 per year per
database for Microsoft SQL Server and $7,385 per year per database for Oracle Database; a 460%
difference in annual cost of administration per database.

Read more... http://www.alinean.com/PDFs/Microsoft_SQL_Server_and_Oracle-Alinean_TCA_Study_2010.pdf

Comments
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